Archives



Evading the Issues: Progressives' Political Taboos

April 02, 1989

Addressing a Unitarian group in a ritzy suburb, I found liberals and moderate conservatives (or progressives) quite keen to discuss the plight of the homeless, the American poor, the starving in Africa, and the beleaguered Nicaraguans.

No Place for Troubled Teen-Agers

April 01, 1989

Sally, 16, used to spend entire weekends with an older man in bohemian Greenwich Village in New York City. For a while, she was sleeping with two guys.

When her more traditionally minded, single mother tried to put an end to these liaisons, Sally told her to buzz off, using a less printable term.Her outraged mother felt she could not “control” Sally and had her committed to a mental hospital with the help of a psychiatrist she knew. Because Sally tried to escape by breaking down a door, she was declared “violent” and heavily sedated. Now she drifts between docility and disorientation.

Recession is Not a Solution

March 20, 1989

The Federal Reserve under Chairman Alan Greenspan is well on its way to inducing yet another recession, for no good reason.

Choosing Social Science Paradigms

March 01, 1989

The dialogue between the prevailing and the challenging social science paradigms builds on basic differences in social philosophy: the two positions contain divergent views of human nature (are people basically knaves or nobles?) and of social order (are individuals naturally harmonious or is man wolf to man?).

Good Ethics Is Good Business – Really

February 12, 1989

As scandals mount in the financial and commodities markets, economists theorize that the market determines one’s ethicality. If “everybody” cheats, those who don’t’ will be wiped out. Like much economic writing, this conclusion is not based on factual observations of ethical traders who went bankrupt, but on abstract theories about “perfect competition.

The 'Me First' Model in the Social Sciences Is Too Narrow

February 01, 1989

The neoclassical view predominating in both the social sciences and the public realm is that people always pursue their own self-interest. 

Status-Separation and Status-Fusion: The Role of PACs in Contemporary American Democracy

January 02, 1989

Though there is wide agreement among political scientists that separation of political and socio-economic statuses is necessary for the functioning of democracy, wide disagreement exists over the extent to which political statuses in the United States differ from socio-economic ones.

To Just Say No Leaves Vacuum That Still Yearns to Be Filled

December 29, 1988

The campaign to convince Americans, especially the young, to refrain from using controlled substances, is negative in focus. It admonishes, threatens and demands self-restraint.

A Consumption Tax: More Injustice for the Poor

October 10, 1988

If Michael Dukakis wins in November, and if he heeds the advice of many liberal economists, he will introduce a tax on consumption in 1989.

Seek High Growth, Not Deficit Reduction

October 01, 1988

The policy advisers surrounding Michael Dukakis and George Bush are focused on the wrong economic policy goals, emphasizing deficit reductions instead of higher economic growth with little inflation.

Don’t Bash Economics–Blend It

September 25, 1988

Economist-bashing is a fundamentally dishonest activity. Executives, government officials, intellectuals make cracks about yet another failure of the dismal science only to heed economists’ advice the next day; indeed, pay for it. There is a better way. Blend economics with heavy doses of psychology and sociology to create a new science the recognizes more of the complexities of the real world: socio-economics.

Institutionalized Child-Care: Can It Fill Parenting Deficit?

September 14, 1988

America is increasingly doing to its children what it has done to its elderly, and to worse effect: separating them out of the family and warehousing them in poorly supervised institutions.

Preventive Recession’ Won’t Help the Country

June 28, 1988

Under the guidance of mainstream economists, the country is considering a highly dubious policy. Experts, public leaders and large segments of the public are forming a consensus that after the election the next president ought to cut the budget and foreign trade deficits drastically. This is what a bipartisan National Commission on Economics is expected to recommend, a policy that has already been favored by 54 other study groups and public interest lobbies, according to one list.

Kicking economy on way down

June 26, 1988

Under the guidance of mainstream economists, the country is locking into a highly dubious policy. Experts, public leaders and large segments of the public are forming a consensus that after the election the next president ought to cut domestic (budgetary) and international (trade) deficits drastically.

This is what a bipartisan National Commission on Economics is expected to recommend, a policy that has already been favored by 54 other study groups, public interest lobbies, etc., according to one list.

ACLU is Running a Risk: Excessive Individualism

June 25, 1988

John Tanton, M.D., is about to strike again. This time his target is the American Civil Lbierties Union (ACLU). He is launching a counter-organization, the American Civil Rights and Responsibilities Union (ACRRU). The ACRRU will conduct educational campaigns, draft legislation, and file briefs to help ensure that the rights and needs of the commons will not be neglected in hot pursuit of Me-ism and special interests.